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LIFESTYLE

Thought to Be Extinct, Rare Creature Sighted in New Engalnd

Anthropologists confirm that the photo taken is clearly a male Homo Aereas Niues, commonly known as a "kid that shovels snow," long-thought to be extinct.

(UPI) Worcester, MA – Residents of Worcester, Massachusetts are keeping an eye out, hoping to spot a creature that has not been seen for nearly 40 years. Anthropologists say that the creature, commonly called the “kid that shovels snow,” has come back from the brink of extinction.

Eighty-nine-year-old Irene Collins says that one of the creatures came right up to her front door during the height of a recent snow storm.

“I heard a tapping sound at my front door. When I looked out the window, I saw a boy standing there with a snow shovel in his hand. At first, I thought he was trying to break into my house, but he asked me if I wanted my walkway shoveled. I was so shocked that I slammed the door in his face,” said the stunned woman.

According to Mike Peterson, with the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game, the Homo Aereas Niues, commonly called “the kid that shovels snow” was last seen in the Worcester area in 1974, and was thought to be extinct.

Bill Paxton, an anthropologist at Cornell University, is excited about the sighting.

“Based on the description of several eyewitness accounts and photographs, we believe that the creature is indeed Homo Aereas Niues. Identifying characteristics of this particular species are wet feet, cold hands, runny nose and pockets stuffed with money. It can’t be anything else. To see a living specimen—and in broad daylight—is quite remarkable. We need to capture one and study it.”

“The demise of the Homo Aereas Niues is attributed to the introduction of the Atari game system into its domestic habitat,” explains Paxton. “The video game caused weakness and kept the species’ young indoors, away from necessary fresh air and sunshine. The proliferation of the video game attacked the work ethic at an early age, rendering the young Homo Aereas Niues lazy. They became reliant solely on their parents for sustenance and monetary support.”

Experts say the young Homo Aereas Niues has been identified as Timmy Sullivan of Chester Street. According to reports, he shoveled four driveways and six walkways, earning nearly 140 dollars for his efforts. Local animal control officers cornered and trapped the cold-footed youngster and brought him to a local animal shelter.

“We weren’t sure what to do with it. It didn’t seem aggressive. We fed it a grilled cheese sandwich, some Doritos and hot cocoa with mini-marshmallows,” said Worcester Animal Control Officer, Marty Santos. “We took a couple of pictures and then we released it back into the wild.”

Ted Schmidt of Worcester, MA, points to where he spotted the rare species.

Timmy’s mother, Sheila Sullivan, said her son has always exhibited the entrepreneurial characteristics typical of the Homo Aereas Niues.

“Timmy has always been a hard worker. He always had a paper route, mowed lawns or did odd jobs. He probably got the idea of snow shoveling from stories his uncles told him. Timmy certainly didn’t get his work ethic from his father, who was laid-off two years ago and hasn’t worked one day since. If work was a bed, my husband would sleep on the floor.”

Mrs. Collins has mixed reactions to seeing “kids that shovel snow” again.

“I’m glad they’re back but I’ll won’t hire him. That boy wanted fifteen dollars to shovel my walk. I’ll do it myself and risk breaking my hip rather than pay that much money.”

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About Bobby Bou

Editor of The Daily Cricket

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